Interview: Common obstacles PMs introduce

This question — about problems project managers impose on their projects — wraps up my interview with Stephen Ritchie (@ruthlesshelp, blog here). author of Pro .NET Best Practices (Amazon paperback & Kindle, Barnes & Noble).    Remember that Stephen describes a promotion to get 40-percent-off his book at his blog here.     I hope you all found it as interesting as I did:

What are common obstacles that project managers introduce into projects?

Haste. I like to say, “schedule pressure is the enemy of good design.” During project retrospectives, all too often, I find the primary technical design driver was haste. Not maintainability, not extensibility, not correctness, not performance … haste.  This common obstacle is a silent killer. It is the Sword of Damocles that … when push comes to shove … drives so many important design objectives underground or out the window.
 
Ironically, the haste is driven by an imagined or arbitrary deadline. I like to remind project managers and developers that for quick and dirty solutions … the dirty remains long after the quick is forgotten. At critical moments, haste is important. But haste is an obstacle when it manifests itself as technical debt, incurred carelessly and having no useful purpose.
 
Other obstacles include compartmentalization, isolation, competitiveness, and demotivation. Here’s the thing. Most project managers need to get their team members to bring creativity, persistence, imagination, dedication, and collaboration to their projects if the project is going to be successful. These are the very things team members *voluntarily* bring to the project.
 
Look around the project; anything that doesn’t help and motivate individuals  to interact effectively is an obstacle. Project managers must avoid introducing these obstacles and focus on clearing them.
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