Web 2.0 and PMO functions

We’ve just started digging into a large-scale re-architecture of our various methodologies.  As you might imagine, the consequences of our approach include changes to the processes, people, and technologies behind content production and maintenance.  

In particular, leverage social media to author, publish, and distribute much more content than we do today.  We’re pleased with our technology direction.  However, we are concerned about some of the organizational change management challenges ahead — for example, many potential contributors feel like their competitive advantage is what’s in their heads. 

Are there any social media adoption strategies that work well when engaging constituencies that aren’t inclined to share?

Giving up on Web 2.0 as penance?

Tom Davenport‘s latest post (here) on Harvard Business Online channels the tone of today’s conventional wisdom.  Many commentators on the Panic of 2008 — including Davenport — are invoking the Great Depression and its harsh lessons.  I guess hairshirts and flagellant confraternities will be coming back next.

While I love mortification of the flesh as much as anyone, I think Davenport’s seriously off-track here.  He’s gone gloom-and-doom just as social media is doing some heavy lifting.  An example of Enterprise 2.0 traction, you say?  OK, what does it say when a guy like Michael Krigsman — who is on the IT Project Failures beat, for goodness sake — praises Enterprise 2.0 efforts from SAP (here) and Oracle (here)?

I hate to bad-rap a fellow Babsonian, but maybe Tom needs to get out of Starbucks more…

Top 100 Development Blogs

Jurgen Appelo posted an excellent list of his Top 100 Development Blogs (here).  I had considered self-nominating Crossderry, but wondered if I was sufficiently on-topic. 

It does, however, look like Jurgen casts a broad and eclectic net.   I’ve already found four or five blogs I’m going to follow more closely.

Measuring Blog Reach/Impact…beyond Technorati

Well, it appears that Technorati is somewhat recovered from its earlier dysfunction (see here).  However, it is far from all the way up.  I still need to manually ping it to get posts to appear and I don’t trust my authority and rank numbers anymore.  Never mind the cries for help, satisfaction, and justice I hear that still go unanswered by Technorati support.

Because I’m on a WordPress-hosted blog, I can’t use some analytics packages, but I’m looking to move beyond Technorati.  I’ve found at least three reasonably-useful sites thanks to Sara at Pajama Professional (post here). 

Xinu Returns pulls together a good summary of ratings — especially the backlinks — from a variety of social media sites.  I’ve found it useful to use CubeStat or Website Outlook in conjunction with Xinu Returns, mostly to validate my pageviews/day (which are incomplete in WordPress-hosted stats).

Any other sites/approaches to recommend?

Texting, Talking, Twitter, and I’m getting old

I felt my age when saw this post on Texting vs. Talking (post here) by Kathleen Moriarty at relentlessPR.  It isn’t that I don’t prefer texting to talking — I am a weakish, but definitite “I” on my MBTI.   Texting gives a bit of distance that is attractive to this introvert.

Perhaps it’s because I related so heavily to my future as a parent when I read this passage:

Luckily for parents, texting is a great way for them to communicate with their kids. 68% of American parents communicate with their kids by text message, and 53% of texting kids say that their relationship with their parents has improved because of texting. It’s an easy way for parents to touch base with their kids without intruding too much – it’s much easier for kids to send a discreet text message to their parents rather than to actually call them when out with friends.

Of course, perhaps it was because Kathleen’s post reminded me of a recent episode where I also felt my age. I was asked by two correspondents — within a day of each other — to point them to my Twitter feed.  I had to sheepishly explain that I don’t tweet and likely won’t for a while. Twitter would just kill my day job.   Also, the “always-on” connectivity would eat into my personal life (though I could give round-the-clock Jon updates).

But most of all, the idea that people would care enough to follow me on Twitter 24/7/365 would be too much encouragement for my already overly-developed ego.  If my colleagues and family think I’m insufferable now…  :-)

Mentorship Start-up “Crash Course”

I very much liked this BNET article by Jennifer Alsever on starting a mentorship drive (here).  The article is rich with sources and tips, so check it out.  The four basic steps are listed below:

Decide Why You Want a Mentor Program — Set your program up to succeed by defining goals and involving top execs.
Pair Up Proteges and Mentors — Create profiles and match people according to your goals.
Set the Rules for Engagement — Make sure people meet regularly — and know what to talk about when they do.
Keep Tabs on the Program — Make sure mentoring is providing the results you want.

Not that I’m looking to integrate mentorship into my group’s social media strategy, I appreciated the explicit decision and goal-setting advice.  I’ve seen many explicit promotions of mentorship in people development efforts, but I’ve never had any real idea of what that mentorship was supposed to accomplish.  Now that I have a chance to drive this topic, perhaps I can learn from those mistakes!

What is the deal w/ Technorati?

Does anyone have any idea what’s up w/ Technorati?  It seems like they’ve had recurring index, link, and authority update issues since the beginning of the year.  I’d like to rely on them — I see backlinks and other comments there I can’t see other places.

Also, I’m surprised Michael Krigsman hasn’t posted on them again.  I’m starting to wonder if they really did get to the bottom of what ailed them six months ago (Michael’s “kudos” post here).

SAP seeding innovation via ecosystem collaboration

In the wake of our nice Q2-2008 results (here), I’m more convinced than ever that SAP’s ecosystem collaboration model (SDN here) is a un-heralded differentiator.  It may not be so un-heralded anymore…see this article from John Hagel and John Seely Brown (here).  Two of their lessons learned jumped out:

Ecosystems evolve over time, but the orchestrator plays a key role in seeding and feeding participant initiatives:  Evangelists for collaborative ecosystems often scare off executives with rhetoric suggesting that executives need to give up control and that ecosystems are “self-organizing.”

Too many evangelists preach collaboration “religion” — with all the ideology and doctrine that implies.  Injecting some “spirituality” is the better metaphor.  Executives should be reassured that giving up control doesn’t mean giving up influence and then the approach should be explained and piloted.

On the other hand, sometimes all spirit is taken out of the pitch to appear business-like.  I’m not sure an efficiency argument carries the day either:

Ecosystems are not just about connecting to existing resources—they help provide platforms for distributed innovation and learning:  Many executives tend to view ecosystems in static terms: diverse resources can be accessed and mobilized through ecosystems.

Measuring effectiveness of virtual events

My group is about to embark on a social media journey, so Jonathan’s strong post on the effectiveness of virtual events (here) was timely grist for our KPI mill.  I’m not sure I have anything more than half-baked yet — heck, the dough hasn’t even risen — but it got me thinking about the questions I need to ask. 

I’ll share some of what I’m asking once we get something in the oven…

KM that works — ASAP for Implementation roadmap updates

As a follow-up to my ASAP and WBS features post (here), I should relay a quick KM win anecdote and give kudos to my team.  The director who leads our methodology and enablement team drove a simple, but effective, effort to incorporate the conversation from our internal social media into our external-facing methodologies.  A new set of accelerators – samples, templates, and white papers – was published based on frequency analysis of the questions and answers from internal discussions hosted on our internal SAP Corporate Portal.   

Furthermore, the team focused on available material — i.e., well-regarded accelerators already published — so we could respond efficiently and effectively.  The results of this initiative are now available in the ASAP for Implementation Roadmap and are embedded in our PMO innovation lifecycle.

  • Sample Conversion and Interface Strategy
  • Configuration Documentation Template/Sample
  • Sample Cutover Plan
  • Business Process Flow Template/Sample
  • Requirements Traceability Matrix Practice Document
  • Business Blueprint Presentation Sample
  • Authorization Definition Template/Sample
  • Knowledge Transfer Template
  • Production Support Strategy and Production Support Plan
  • Data Conversion Methods and Metrics Guideline
  • Centralized Data Management White Paper
  • Sample Test Cases
  • Integration Test Signoff Template
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