What is “ready to use”?

Sorry, Derek, it's prêt-à-l'emploi not prêt-à-porter.

I’ve found that the packaged application and custom development fields make at least some nod to standard project management practices.  No doubt there are many suboptimal practitioners, but few ignore or openly bad mouth project management.

Infrastructure — servers, network, and desktop — appears to still be another matter.  I’ve been shocked by how much expediting and Potemkin planning — plans that are only for show — I’ve seen in the last six months.  One of the most frustrating practices is when IT Operations claims victory over useless milestones after having claimed that planning would have done nothing but slow them down.

Perhaps slowing down would prevent rework and wasted effort (by one’s customers!).  For example, our service provider’s infrastructure team tried to get credit for server delivery.  Except that the server was only powered on and connected to a network — it was far from “fit for use.”  No one could access the network remotely — is it based in a data center after all — and even if they could potential users were then stymied by no log-on being set ups.  Never mind that we couldn’t use the server anyway because it hadn’t been qualified (we’re in a FDA validated industry).

If you don’t own “fitness for use” as the underpinning of your deliverables, you aren’t managing your projects, you’re playing “whack-a-mole“.

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