Q2 Inbound Links and Comments — Thanks and Kudos

Links and comments are the about the only way for me to know if I’m writing something interesting, useful, or at least provocative.  I appreciate each and every one.

Thanks to the following folks for linking to Crossderry this past quarter…

  • The folks over at relentless PR, especially Leo Bottary (here and here)
  • Bas at Project Shrink (here)
  • Scott Middleton (here)
  • Mary Adams at Hybrid Vigor (here)
  • Rafael at Better Projects (here)
  • Miguel at eme ka eme (here)

Also, thank you to those who commented… (many of the folks above commented as well, but I won’t duplicate)

  • Vinnie Mirchandani at Deal Architect (here)
  • Charles Green at Trusted Advisor (here)
  • Jonathan Becher at Manage by Walking Around (here)
  • Michael Krigsman at IT Project Failures (here)
  • Patti Choby (here)
  • Rich Maltzman at Scope Crepe (here)
  • Markus at Leadership Briefing (here)
  • One of the gang at PM Think (here)
  • Craig Brown at Better Projects (here)
  • Bill at Projects Possible (here)
  • lazymale at lap31 (here)

Apologies if I missed anyone…  Thanks again, Paul

Enterprise SW value, complexity, and R&D

Dennis Howlett’s extended response (here) to Vinnie Mirchandani’s post demanding more simplicity — or begging Steve Jobs to find it — in enterprise apps (here).  Dennis effectively boils down Vinnie’s argument to this:

Why is it that despite all the interest in SaaS and Enterprise 2.0 that the industry offers so very little apparent bang per buck for business as a whole?

Way too much to comment on comprehensively, but here are three:

  1. Behind the simplicity of iTunes lies the complexity of SAP ERP.   Every time you hit iTunes, you’re hitting SAP ERP.  Tell me again that the iTunes/iPhone model would work without ERP and that Apple’s not getting value out of its investment. 
  2. Enterprise software is modeling a business in real-time — a non-trivial, complex task that evolves in time.  Per Dennis’s comment about the process approach, once you try to take enterprise SW beyond implementing functions you’ve gotten into the business process management business whether you like it or not.
  3. Brian Sommer‘s comment is spot on: modern portfolio management is just getting introduced to the SW business.  Perhaps it should be a bit more ruthless.  Vampire/zombie projects, rampant cross-subsidization, and derivative products litter the R&D landscape in both commercial and in-house software development. 
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